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(011) 884 4133

(011) 784 6941 fax

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51 13th Street
Parkmore
Johannesburg
2196 

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Spirocera - a silent killer!

Spircocerca is a dangerous worm that is potentially infecting dogs all over JHB. Read the attached article for more info about this nasty parasite & how to prevent it.

 

A fat animal is an unhealthy animal!

Being overweight predisposes your pet to (amongst others)  joint pain, diabetes, pancreatitis, raised blood pressure, increased anaesthetic risk, heart failure and respiratory complications. Feeding the right food at the right quantity, with the correct level of exercise is vital to your pets continued health. Feel free to ask us for advice about your pets weight.

Don't forget to check your pets teeth!

Bad breath is usually as a result of poor oral health. If your pets teeth are not sparkling white or if the gums are red (not pink) or bleed easily, then dental attention is probably required. We have a top-class dental set-up to help restore your pets' mouth back to optimal health (and pleasant smelling!!) Click HERE for a great article about your pets oral health.

Don't ignore a limp!

If your pet limps for more than 3 days, he/she needs to be seen.  Leaving a problem for longer can result in rapid progression of joint disease (arthritis).  Our modern X-ray facilities can aid in the diagnosis of many joint and bone related problems.

How often should I deworm my pet?

We recommend deworming dogs and cats every 3-4 months. The dewormers (which are available from our receptionists) are effective against all the major worm groups. This is especially important where young children are present, as potentially serious medical complications can arise from pet worm infestations in humans.

PS - it is also a good idea to deworm all the humans periodically as well!

Why is vaccination important?

Vaccination protects our pets against several potentially serious and even fatal diseases. In earlier years, these diseases caused great devastation and suffering, but are now largely preventable through vaccination. We can advise you on the correct vaccination schedule for your pets.

Does my pet need tick and flea control?

Ticks and fleas, besides causing pain and irritation can also transmit diseases. They are not always easily seen and can become a major problem in the household very quickly! Prevention is so much easier than cure. We have a range of very effective, easy to use products that will keep your pet free from these nasty parasites. Although less prevalent in winter, they are present all year round, so your pets should continue to receive treatment throughout the year. We do not recommend powders or shampoos as a form of prophylaxis as these do not provide any residual activity, and are not particularly effective.

 

GREAT NEW ARTICLE:

If you are looking for a great guide on how to brush your pets teeth, click on the link below. We keep a great range of toothbrushes, toothpaste and other dental treats for your pets optimal dental health.

How to brush your pets teeth.

Vet Articles

All | Breeding | Dental | Diet | Disease | Emergency | Eye | General | Heart | Illness | Joints | Lifestyle | Skin | Symptoms | Worms

Cancer in pets - Part 2 of 2

Cancer

The treatment of cancer in pets has become a significant part of the therapy provided by veterinarians to keep our pet population healthy and thriving. Depending on the modality used, the type and extent of cancer treated, and the size and the nature of the animal involved, cancer treatment can be very expensive. Therefore, as with any disease, the principle of prevention is better than cure holds true. Not all cancers can be prevented but there are certain types of cancers which can be prevented and others that, if treated early on, require much less invasive treatment and therapy, than cancers which are left to develop.



Children and pets

Children

Children and pets are synonymous. Most families at some point in time acquire a pet for their children. Be it goldfish, pocket pets like hamsters, mice, gerbils or guinea pigs, birds, dogs, cats, rabbits or even something exotic like a snake, a tortoise, bearded dragon or iguana. Pets come in all shapes and sizes and often times they are given to a child as a gift. Sometimes the child has not asked for a pet and receives one without receiving proper instructions on how to care for it. Many times children will beg and nag their parents for a certain type of pet, and eventually wear the parents down with their continuous nagging to the point where the parents cave in to the demands of the child to preserve the peace. This peace only lasts for a very brief moment before the parents realise that they made a big mistake.



Cancer in pets - Part 1 of 2

Cancer

The battle against cancer in humans is as old as mankind itself. Since veterinary medicine became a fully-fledged discipline in the previous century, this battle has been extended to animals, and more so than any other area of veterinary medicine, to our pets. Many animal owners who are confronted with cancer in their pet for the first time, are somewhat surprised to find out that cancer is as prevalent in animals as it is in humans. Once they have overcome the initial shock, they find it even more surprising that cancer in animals is treated very much the same way in animals as in humans.



Smelling as fresh as a spring breeze

How to bath your pet


Human hygiene and animal hygiene are worlds apart. Whatever is considered to be clean for humans is totally something else for our pets. Dirt may easily be disguised in the thick (or thin) coat of a pet and only once the animal is washed do we really see how dirty they are.

Cats spend their days and nights grooming themselves. However many cats love taking a dust bath and will revel in the opportunity to curl and then wriggle on their back from side to side on a nice patch of bare soil.



Fireworks and Thunderstorms and your pet

Anxiety Attacks in pets

Anxiety and angst is as much part of the animal world as it is of the human world. As humans, the way in which we manage stress and anxiety is largely related to our understanding of our environment and an interpretation of cause and effect. Unfortunately this is not the same for animals. A human who is about to set off a large fire cracker can warn all those around them of the impending bang, and prepare everyone for the impact. However explaining to a dog or cat that the glitter of a burning fuse will lead to a thunderous crack to which they should not respond, is impossible. Add to that the anatomy of animals’ ears which have been specifically designed to amplify sounds by turning the ears towards sounds, and you have a recipe for disaster when it comes to shooting off fireworks in the vicinity of animals.



New puppies and kittens - Part 3 of 3

Breeding with my dog or cat � Should I or should I not?

Nobody will dispute the cuteness of puppies or kittens. These adorable little creatures really pull at the heartstrings and appeal to young and old. However spending some time in a puppy or kitten shelter and seeing what undernourished or uncared for puppies or kittens look like, will make anyone who is serious about the well being of animals think twice about indiscriminate breeding.



Frequently Asked Questions about Rabies

Rabies

How often must I vaccinate my dog?
Puppies should be vaccinated at 3 months old with a booster vaccination required a month later and a booster given within 12 months of original vaccination. Thereafter animals who live in Rabies endemic areas like KwaZulu Natal should be given a rabies vaccination every year and animals living in non-Rabies endemic areas every 3 years by law,  but preferably also yearly, because in places like Johannesburg which is non-Rabies endemic there have been several outbreaks of Rabies in the past few years.



Rabies

Important information about Rabies and who to prevent it

Rabies, a fatal disease of humans and all other mammals, is caused by a virus which has been associated with animal bites for more than 3 000 years and it is the oldest infectious disease known to medical science. Dogs have long been recognised as the main transmitters of the disease to people. When compared with other formidable human diseases such as Bubonic Plague and Smallpox, and animal diseases such as Rinderpest and Anthrax, Rabies has probably never caused comparably high numbers of deaths in humans and animals. However, the horrendous manner in which Rabies manifests itself in its victims continues to attract the attention of scientists, health and veterinary workers. The true scale of Rabies in South Africa remains clouded by the many thousands of people protected by post-exposure treatment each year after Rabies exposure and the undiagnosed human and animal Rabies cases not reflected in official statistics.



New puppies and kittens - Part 2 of 3

Pregnancy, birth and aftercare

Gestation (Pregnancy)

Dogs are on average pregnant for 63 days after fertilisation has taken place. It may be difficult to determine exactly when a bitch fell pregnant if multiple matings took place over a number of days and therefore pregnancy may seem to be longer than 63 days, sometimes up to 72 days. Sperm can also stay alive in the female genital tract for a few days and therefore fertilisation may happen a day or two or even up to a few days after mating.



New puppies and kittens - Part 1 of 3

Heat and Mating in dogs and cats

Few things in life are cuter than a puppy or kitten! If you would like to let your dog or cat have a litter of puppies or kittens there are a number of things you need to know in preparation for the process.

The Heat Period

“Coming into season” or “going on heat”, is the time in a female dog (bitch) or cat’s (queen’s) life when they are receptive to a male animal and can mate to reproduce. Dogs and cats normally come on heat for the first time somewhere between the ages of 5 to 9 months. Smaller dog breeds mature earlier than larger or giant breeds, and will usually come on heat between 5 and 6 months of age. Large and giant dog breeds will usually come on heat after 6 months, sometimes only around 9 months of age. Cats on the other hand may in actually fact come into season as young as 4 months of age and therefore proper “family planning” is very important.  



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Business Hours

Mondays-Fridays
08:00 - 11:00; 14:30 - 17:30

Saturdays  
08:00 - 12:00

Sundays  & Public Holidays
09:00 - 10:00