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(011) 884 4133

(011) 784 6941 fax

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51 13th Street
Parkmore
Johannesburg
2196 

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Spirocera - a silent killer!

Spircocerca is a dangerous worm that is potentially infecting dogs all over JHB. Read the attached article for more info about this nasty parasite & how to prevent it.

 

A fat animal is an unhealthy animal!

Being overweight predisposes your pet to (amongst others)  joint pain, diabetes, pancreatitis, raised blood pressure, increased anaesthetic risk, heart failure and respiratory complications. Feeding the right food at the right quantity, with the correct level of exercise is vital to your pets continued health. Feel free to ask us for advice about your pets weight.

Don't forget to check your pets teeth!

Bad breath is usually as a result of poor oral health. If your pets teeth are not sparkling white or if the gums are red (not pink) or bleed easily, then dental attention is probably required. We have a top-class dental set-up to help restore your pets' mouth back to optimal health (and pleasant smelling!!) Click HERE for a great article about your pets oral health.

Don't ignore a limp!

If your pet limps for more than 3 days, he/she needs to be seen.  Leaving a problem for longer can result in rapid progression of joint disease (arthritis).  Our modern X-ray facilities can aid in the diagnosis of many joint and bone related problems.

How often should I deworm my pet?

We recommend deworming dogs and cats every 3-4 months. The dewormers (which are available from our receptionists) are effective against all the major worm groups. This is especially important where young children are present, as potentially serious medical complications can arise from pet worm infestations in humans.

PS - it is also a good idea to deworm all the humans periodically as well!

Why is vaccination important?

Vaccination protects our pets against several potentially serious and even fatal diseases. In earlier years, these diseases caused great devastation and suffering, but are now largely preventable through vaccination. We can advise you on the correct vaccination schedule for your pets.

Does my pet need tick and flea control?

Ticks and fleas, besides causing pain and irritation can also transmit diseases. They are not always easily seen and can become a major problem in the household very quickly! Prevention is so much easier than cure. We have a range of very effective, easy to use products that will keep your pet free from these nasty parasites. Although less prevalent in winter, they are present all year round, so your pets should continue to receive treatment throughout the year. We do not recommend powders or shampoos as a form of prophylaxis as these do not provide any residual activity, and are not particularly effective.

 

GREAT NEW ARTICLE:

If you are looking for a great guide on how to brush your pets teeth, click on the link below. We keep a great range of toothbrushes, toothpaste and other dental treats for your pets optimal dental health.

How to brush your pets teeth.

Vet Articles

All | Breeding | Dental | Diet | Disease | Emergency | Eye | General | Heart | Illness | Joints | Lifestyle | Skin | Symptoms | Worms

My dog is scooting on its backside and I think it has worms

Anal sac disease in dogs

Many veterinarians are presented by concerned pet owners about the animal’s scooting or dragging their backsides along the ground by holding the back legs up in the air and pulling themselves forward by the front legs whilst remaining in a seated position. The owner often thinks that the animal may have worms and is trying to get the worms out their backside by dragging it along the ground. Although this is quite possible to be the case, especially in the case of tapeworm infestation, it is unlikely to be the cause. The most common cause for this behaviour is uncomfortable anal glands.



My pet is not responding to me

Deafness in pets

Pets are known to have an acute sense of hearing. What would cause them to lose this ability? How will they cope with deafness? To answer these questions we first have to look at the normal anatomy of the ear.

Dog and cats ears, much like humans, can be divided into three areas: the outer ear, middle ear and inner ear.

  • The outer ear consists of the external earflap called the pinna, and the ear canal which is a narrow tube through which sound vibrations enter the ear.
  • The middle ear contains the eardrum, a membrane that vibrates correspondingly to the incoming sound waves, and the small little bones on the inside of the eardrum called the auditory ossicles. These small bones transmit the eardrum vibrations to the inner ear.
  • The inner ear, located deeper within the skull, contains the cochlea, a snail-shaped structure containing nerve endings that receive the vibrations and pass nervous system signals along to the brain, thereby enabling hearing.



Is your pet safe?

Fatal Diseases that can easily be prevented

Fatal Diseases that can easily be prevented

There are some fairly common fatal diseases in animals which can and should be prevented wherever possible. This article looks at how these diseases present, what they lead to and most importantly how they could be prevented. Today we have more information about our animals and the diseases they may suffer from than ever before. With this knowledge comes the means of preventing these conditions that years ago would have meant certain death to our beloved pets. The most important means of disease prevention readily available to us is vaccination. A simple annual health check and vaccinations can help ensure your pet lives a long and healthy life. Other important means of prevention includes regular deworming as well as tick and flea treatment.



A sugar substitute fit for humans, which can be lethal to your dog

Xylitol Toxicity

What is xylitol and where can it be found?

Xylitol is a natural sugar alcohol that is commonly used as a sugar substitute in human foods. It is found in and extracted from corn fiber, birch trees, hardwood trees as well as other fruits and vegetables.

Xylitol is a sugar substitute most commonly found in chewing gum, candies, breath mints, baked goods, cough syrup, children’s edible vitamins, mouth wash and tooth paste (all of the sugar free variety). There are many more human products on the market that may contain xylitol. It may also be purchased in a granulated form to be used for baking, or as a sweetener over cereals and in beverages. As society’s pressure to look lean and slim, and the need to diet increases, this sugar free alternative has grown drastically in popularity over the last decade.



False Pregnancy

Pregnancy

False pregnancy, also known as Phantom pregnancy or Pseudo-pregnancy, is a condition of both dogs and cats, whereby the unsterilised female animal (regardless of whether she was mated or not) shows some or all of the typical signs of pregnancy but is not really pregnant. In other words, she shows mammary gland development (with or without milk production) but does not produce any offspring.



Lameness in old dogs

Lameness

As a dog gets older, he or she may start to struggle to get up or get a little slower on walks. You may notice that they are worse in winter than in summer or after resting for a prolonged period. Sometimes they may not to be able to place any weight on a leg at all and this may happen quite suddenly. Lameness in older dogs can be broadly placed in three categories:



Lameness in young dogs

Lameness

Getting home to find your puppy or young dog not placing weight on a leg is always a concern. There are many different reasons why a young dog may limp, some more serious than others. Causes of lameness can be broadly placed into three different categories:

  • Lameness due to trauma
  • Developmental and congenital (inherited) lameness
  • Infectious causes of lameness and cancer

Because the causes of lameness can be so wide and varied, it is important to have your puppy looked at by the veterinarian sooner rather than later when you notice any signs of limping or lameness. 



Proptosis

Displacement of the eyeball

Proptosis is defined, as the forward displacement of the globe (eyeball) out of the socket, with the eyelids trapped behind the globe.

Proptosis is an ophthalmic emergency. Any suspected trauma to your pet’s eye warrants a visit to your veterinarian immediately.

Let us first have a look at the normal eye anatomy:

Predisposing factors: Breed predisposition

Proptosis is a condition more commonly seen in Brachycephalic breeds (dogs with prominent bulging eyes, short noses and shallow eye sockets). Pekingese, Pug, Boston terrier and Shihtzu are over represented.



Breeding with your dog

Breeding

Understanding the female’s cycle

A female dog will only come into heat for the first time between the age of seven months and anytime up to a year of age. Occasionally this period may be longer. The age at which they first come into heat is governed by a combination of factors but usually smaller breeds start at a slightly younger age than the larger breeds. This is by no means a set rule as there is a great variation. Once she has started to cycle, a female dog will then come into heat every 4 to 7 months but your giant breed dogs may only cycle once every 12 to 18 months. It can take up to 2 years for them to develop regular cycles. Once started the heat cycle can last 2 to 3 weeks. There are two main parts to a female’s cycles namely pro-oestrous and oestrous. Pro-oestrous is the period during which her vulva will be very swollen, she may have a bloody discharge (volume varies greatly) and she will not allow any males to mount her. This is essentially the non-receptive part of her cycle. The second part is known as oestrous. At this point her vulva is still swollen, any bleeding has stopped and most importantly this is the period during which she is receptive to males and will allow mating. It is essential to understand this to avoid unwanted pregnancy. It is only when the bleeding stops that she is in full heat and at her most fertile.



Can I give my dog a bone?

Feeding your dog bones - the good, the bad and the ugly

Although most of us grew up with the assumption that bones are good for our pets this is in fact a fallacy, one that more pet owners should be made aware of.  Let’s look at some effects and risks involved when feeding bones to pets.

The Good:

The unfortunate truth is that the only good thing about feeding your dog bones is that they like it and it keeps them busy, especially if they have a tendency to chew. Sadly just as we all enjoy our McDonalds, KFC and pizza we know these foods are not good for our health and the same applies to bones for your dog. They carry no nutritional value and are indigestible. Perhaps the only part of the bone a dog may actually eat and digest would be bone marrow.



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Business Hours

Mondays-Fridays
08:00 - 11:00; 14:30 - 17:30

Saturdays  
08:00 - 12:00

Sundays  & Public Holidays
09:00 - 10:00